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Organization Emphasizes Retaining, Not Just Hiring Veterans

Image of Indiana Public Radio logoNearly half of all military veterans returning to the workforce leave their jobs in the first year, according to the National Organization on Disability. The turnover rate is about 75 percent within two years.

These statistics are particularly important in Indiana, where the unemployment rate among post-9/11 veterans in Indiana is more than double the state average overall.

But organizations like NOD are seeking ways to reduce those numbers.

Franklin Hagenbeck, a retired lieutenant general and sits on the board of directors of the National Organization on Disability, says his group has developed a guide for employers on ways to accommodate veterans in the workplace.

On Veterans Day, Let’s Help Keep Vets Employed

Image of HuffingtonPost LogoHUFFINGTON POST BLOG By CAROL GLAZER, President, National Organization on Disability

The nearly three million men and women who have returned home from Iraq and Afghanistan are encountering what veterans of previous wars have long known—that the transition from the all-encompassing regimen of military life to the free form competition of the civilian workforce, presents many challenges.

Thanks to the commitment of hundreds of large employers, veterans are finding meaningful employment opportunities. Where once our challenge as a society was simply finding a good job for our veterans, today it is ensuring that they remain employed for years to come. We know that turnover rates are extremely high—nearly 50 percent in year one and almost 75 percent by year two. We must do better.

The New York Times Opinion Pages | Rights of the Disabled

Image of New York Times logo ​A Letter from NOD President Carol Glazer

Re “Finding Independence, and a Bond” (This Land, front page, Oct. 5): Your article about Peter Maxmean and Lori Sousa, who met while working at a workshop for people with intellectual disabilities, shines a powerful light on a pervasive problem in this country. The article suggests that America is ready to confront a civil rights issue that’s long been left out of the public debate.

For generations, Americans with disabilities have been hidden from view, housed in institutions where they could be “cared for” by “specially trained professionals” who would keep them safe from harm to themselves and others. Geraldo Rivera, in a Peabody Award-winning exposé about the atrocities of the Willowbrook State School on Staten Island, secretly taped conditions for residents of this peaceful-sounding place.

As a society, we’ve traveled a long way from the dehumanizing “madhouses,” asylums and institutions that kept people with disabilities out of view and the public mind. But the subjects of this article have only a 20 percent likelihood that they’ll find competitive work in today’s labor force, and the chances of living in poverty are nearly three times as great as that of other Americans.

Improving Job Opportunities for College Students with Disabilities

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Image of Play Button Listen to the Radio Interview with Carol Glazer, NOD and Alan Muir, COSD

RIT is being credited by the National Organization on Disability as being a good example of a university that has successfully bridged the employment gap for students with disabilities.

The private, non-profit group promotes the full participation of people with disabilities in all aspects of life. Advocates for people with disabilities say that nationally there is a 46 percent unemployment rate for college grads that have a disability.

The president of the National Organization on Disability, Carol Glazer, says one thing that American businesses could do a better job on in general, is making sure that things like their websites, and their job descriptions are more inclusive.

“It’s everything from how you portray yourself as a company and does that encourage people to come forward and disclose their disabilities when they have them, all the way to how you might be inadvertently screening people out just by the way you phrase your job descriptions.”

RIT Job Fair Embraces All

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Amid the enormity of Wednesday’s job fair at the Rochester Institute of Technology — thousands of students in long lines to impress companies like Google and Apple — a flurry of hands were sometimes visible.

Some of those belonged to deaf and hard of hearing students. And some belonged to interpreters provided by the university to translate the signing of deaf students to employers, and vice versa. By and large, the employers — about 250 signed up — did not provide their own interpreters. Many knew the school would.

RIT, by virtue of its long affiliation with the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, has many deaf students among its population.

Each of those came to the job fair with ambitions and dreams no different from those of hearing students. Their talents, skills and personalities seemed as good as or better than others waiting their turn to even an untrained eye.

National Organizations Join Together to Address Employment Gap for Graduates with Disabilities

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October 1, 2014, Rochester, NY- To jumpstart NDEAM, a coalition of national organizations are shining a spot light on one critical issue facing companies seeking to meet federal disability employment targets: a broken pipeline between employers and and universities who are graduating students with disabilities—and what’s being done to address it.

Representatives from NOD, with National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE); Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilities (COSD); General Electric Aviation; National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID); and Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) address the urgency of connecting graduates with disabilities to employers during the college’s Career Fair.

Let’s Make Compliance the Floor, Not the Ceiling

Op-ed by Randy Lewis, Former SVP at Walgreens’, accidental disability-advocate and featured speaker at NOD’s CEO Council forum “Moving Beyond Compliance”

Image of Randy LewisWay up on the 57th floor of Chase Tower, a group of people came together in Chicago last week who are literally changing the lives of so many Americans living with disabilities. This is an historic moment when our nation can at long last begin to harvest the talents of Americans with disabilities and, in the process, help them enjoy full opportunity for employment and earnings. For those in the workforce, the unemployment rate of people with disabilities in the U.S. is nearly twice the national unemployment rate. It’s a pervasive problem that still exists nearly a quarter century after the Americans with Disabilities Act became law. But you can feel the tide starting to turn.

The National Organization on Disability (NOD), which has been doing great work to help companies close that employment gap, hosted a forum in partnership with Exelon, one of Chicago’s leading employers engaged with this issue. There is now building in corporate America today a new energy and commitment toward workplaces that include people with disabilities with all other diversity segments. Workplaces where people with disabilities are considered for what they can do, not what they can’t. Where employees with disabilities are performing equal tasks and earning equal pay. I had the privilege of leading such a process at Walgreens and shared my experiences with the group assembled this week atop Chase Tower. More on my Walgreens experience in a moment.

One reason this is such a remarkable time is the recent shift in public policy out of Washington. This year, the U.S. Labor Department adopted a rule change that, for the first time, sets a seven-percent hiring goal for people with disabilities if you are a contractor that does business with the federal government. Many companies are working to comply right now, and I know some here in the Midwest have raised concerns. That’s why I’m delighted Patricia Shiu, the point person at DOL who spearheaded the rule change, was able to travel from D.C. to Chicago for this forum. Her office has worked hard to listen to employers to make the transition smoother. My message to corporate America is a simple one: Don’t do it because you have to, do it because it will make your company better.

US Department of Labor News Brief: Workforce Inclusion Forum

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More than 120 business leaders and community advocates attended a symposium on disability employment hosted by the National Organization on Disability and Exelon in Chicago on Sept. 10.

Retired Walgreens Executive Randy Lewis (left) and Carol Glazer, president for the National Organization on Disability (right) listen to OFCCP Director Patricia Shiu at a NOD sponsored symposium in Chicago on hiring and including employees with disabilities.
Retired Walgreens Executive Randy Lewis (left) and Carol Glazer, president for the National Organization on Disability (right) listen to OFCCP Director Patricia Shiu at a NOD sponsored symposium in Chicago on hiring and including employees with disabilities.

Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs Director Patricia A. Shiu discussed the agency’s rule establishing a 7 percent employment goal for people with disabilities by federal contractors and subcontractors. “The experience of companies has overwhelmingly been that these hires are a source of loyal, hard-working talent that boosts corporate productivity,” Shiu said. ​

Retired Walgreens executive Randy Lewis described efforts that led to 10 percent of the company’s workforce consisting of individuals with disabilities. “Don’t hire people with disabilities because you have to, do it because it will make your company better,” he said.

NOD Chairman Gov. Tom Ridge Delivers Keynote Remarks at Pennsylvania Disability Employment Summit

NOD Chairman and former state governor Tom Ridge delivered keynote remarks at the the third-annual Pennsylvania Disability Employment Summit (PADES). The summit brings together business leaders, advocates, providers and persons with disabilities to discuss the importance of helping individuals with disabilities gain employment and achieve independence.

Widely covered by press outlets throughout Pennsylvania, the three-day event featured a Secretaries’ Roundtable with cabinet officials discussing how agencies help provide services that assist individuals with disabilities, information on tax incentives and free training available to employers; updates on transportation for Pennsylvanians with disabilities; and a job fair where businesses can recruit and interview qualified candidates on the spot.

Revisiting the Pain of Mental Illness in America: What Can We Learn From Robin Williams’ Suicide?

Image of HuffingtonPost LogoHuffington Post Blog by NOD President Carol Glazer

As an actor, comic and humanitarian, Robin Williams touched millions of lives. His untimely death by suicide linked to serious depression has deprived all of us of years more of his extraordinary gifts. More importantly, his family lost a husband and father. The media has been abuzz about the profound pain wrought by depression on its victims and their families. But before we move on to the next important news story, let’s first tally up what Robin Williams’ death tells us about the stigmatization of mental illness and the cost of investing in its early detection and treatment vs. the cost of not doing so.

Throughout history, as a society we’ve treated mental illness in short bursts, separated by large periods of benign or active neglect. From the purges and bloodletting in the Middle Ages, to later “madhouses” that housed inhabitants in cages, to reforms creating more humane state hospitals in the late 1800s, public policy has come full circle. In the 1960s we learned that state institutions were no better than incarceration of previous centuries. That recognition led to deinstitutionalization in the mid-1960s, codified by President Kennedy’s funding for treatment facilities through the Community Mental Health Act of 1963. (President Kennedy’s sister Rosemary had famously undergone a lobotomy, which left her inert and unable to speak more than a few words).

But while the number of institutionalized mentally ill people in the United States dropped from a peak of 560,000 to just over 130,000 in 1980, only half of the proposed community mental health centers intended to support individuals who transitioned back to communities were ever built, and many of those that remained were dismantled in the 1970s and ‘80s due to lack of funding. Sadly, the promise of deinstitutionalization—helping vast numbers of people with mental health disabilities lead normal and productive lives through treatment in their communities—was never fulfilled.