The National Organization on Disability

Skip to main navigation | Skip to main content | Skip to sitemap

News

Organization Emphasizes Retaining, Not Just Hiring Veterans

Image of Indiana Public Radio logoNearly half of all military veterans returning to the workforce leave their jobs in the first year, according to the National Organization on Disability. The turnover rate is about 75 percent within two years.

These statistics are particularly important in Indiana, where the unemployment rate among post-9/11 veterans in Indiana is more than double the state average overall.

But organizations like NOD are seeking ways to reduce those numbers.

Franklin Hagenbeck, a retired lieutenant general and sits on the board of directors of the National Organization on Disability, says his group has developed a guide for employers on ways to accommodate veterans in the workplace.

On Veterans Day, Let’s Help Keep Vets Employed

Image of HuffingtonPost LogoHUFFINGTON POST BLOG By CAROL GLAZER, President, National Organization on Disability

The nearly three million men and women who have returned home from Iraq and Afghanistan are encountering what veterans of previous wars have long known—that the transition from the all-encompassing regimen of military life to the free form competition of the civilian workforce, presents many challenges.

Thanks to the commitment of hundreds of large employers, veterans are finding meaningful employment opportunities. Where once our challenge as a society was simply finding a good job for our veterans, today it is ensuring that they remain employed for years to come. We know that turnover rates are extremely high—nearly 50 percent in year one and almost 75 percent by year two. We must do better.

The New York Times Opinion Pages | Rights of the Disabled

Image of New York Times logo ​A Letter from NOD President Carol Glazer

Re “Finding Independence, and a Bond” (This Land, front page, Oct. 5): Your article about Peter Maxmean and Lori Sousa, who met while working at a workshop for people with intellectual disabilities, shines a powerful light on a pervasive problem in this country. The article suggests that America is ready to confront a civil rights issue that’s long been left out of the public debate.

For generations, Americans with disabilities have been hidden from view, housed in institutions where they could be “cared for” by “specially trained professionals” who would keep them safe from harm to themselves and others. Geraldo Rivera, in a Peabody Award-winning exposé about the atrocities of the Willowbrook State School on Staten Island, secretly taped conditions for residents of this peaceful-sounding place.

As a society, we’ve traveled a long way from the dehumanizing “madhouses,” asylums and institutions that kept people with disabilities out of view and the public mind. But the subjects of this article have only a 20 percent likelihood that they’ll find competitive work in today’s labor force, and the chances of living in poverty are nearly three times as great as that of other Americans.

Improving Job Opportunities for College Students with Disabilities

Image of WXXI Logo

Image of Play Button Listen to the Radio Interview with Carol Glazer, NOD and Alan Muir, COSD

RIT is being credited by the National Organization on Disability as being a good example of a university that has successfully bridged the employment gap for students with disabilities.

The private, non-profit group promotes the full participation of people with disabilities in all aspects of life. Advocates for people with disabilities say that nationally there is a 46 percent unemployment rate for college grads that have a disability.

The president of the National Organization on Disability, Carol Glazer, says one thing that American businesses could do a better job on in general, is making sure that things like their websites, and their job descriptions are more inclusive.

“It’s everything from how you portray yourself as a company and does that encourage people to come forward and disclose their disabilities when they have them, all the way to how you might be inadvertently screening people out just by the way you phrase your job descriptions.”

RIT Job Fair Embraces All

Image of Democrat & Chronicle Logo

Amid the enormity of Wednesday’s job fair at the Rochester Institute of Technology — thousands of students in long lines to impress companies like Google and Apple — a flurry of hands were sometimes visible.

Some of those belonged to deaf and hard of hearing students. And some belonged to interpreters provided by the university to translate the signing of deaf students to employers, and vice versa. By and large, the employers — about 250 signed up — did not provide their own interpreters. Many knew the school would.

RIT, by virtue of its long affiliation with the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, has many deaf students among its population.

Each of those came to the job fair with ambitions and dreams no different from those of hearing students. Their talents, skills and personalities seemed as good as or better than others waiting their turn to even an untrained eye.

More News

Events

WEBCAST: Lessons for HR Professionals from the Job Search Experience of Candidates with Disabilities
Tuesday, December 9, 2014

ONLINE COURSE | Employing People with Disabilities: A Business Perspective
Monday, January 12, 2015 - Friday, February 6, 2015

More Events

Press Releases

NOD Sr. Career Specialist Maggie Casteel Honored By National Rehabilitation Association

Image of National Rehabilitation Association logo

November 17, 2014, New York, NY – The National Rehabilitation Association (NRA) recently awarded National Organization on Disability (NOD) Wounded Warrior Careers Program Manager and Senior Career Specialist Maggie Casteel with the 2014 Belle Greve Memorial Award during NRA’s Annual Conference in Des Moines, Iowa. The Belle Greve Memorial Award is given to an individual in recognition of unusual initiative or creativity in developing and/or administering a service program for people with disabilities.

“Maggie brings a unique blend of experience, awareness and depth of understanding concerning rehabilitation issues surrounding trauma and acquired disability,” said NOD President Carol Glazer. “It has been an honor for us at NOD to work alongside a colleague in advancing our mission through our Wounded Warrior Careers program in Pittsburgh, one whose comprehensive, innovative and effective advocacy for disability issues shines with such optimism and accomplishment.”

NOD Releases Guide for Employers Hiring Veterans with Disabilities

Image of Employer Guide

NOD Director Lieutenant General (RET) Franklin L. Hagenbeck, former deputy chief of staff for Personnel, Department of the Army, embarks on a nationwide media tour to share techniques to support veterans’ workplace success
Image of Play Button Listen to the Interview on NPR’s It’s Your Health November 10, 2014, New York, NY - In honor of Veterans Day, the National Organization on Disability (NOD) has released a valuable resource of leading employment practices and actionable tips for successfully recruiting, onboarding, supporting and retaining veterans within a company’s workforce.

There are nearly three million military personnel that have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan that are willing, able and ready for employment opportunities, and many employers are eager to hire them. However, research suggests that a significant number of returning veterans leave their first civilian job within the first year; and over 40% of all post 9/11 vets have reported service-related disabilities. In order to avoid false starts for both the vet and the employer, employers need to be aware of how best to ensure veterans’ success through accommodations and specialized workplace supports.

NOD Salutes WellPoint for its Commitment to a Culture of Inclusion for People with Disabilities

Image of WellPoint logoNovember 6, 2014, New York, NY - The National Organization on Disability (NOD) salutes WellPoint, Inc., one of the nation’s leading health benefits companies, for its commitment to welcoming and supporting people with disabilities.

WellPoint is a member of NOD’s CEO Council, which gives companies an opportunity to distinguish themselves as leaders in diversity and employers of choice for people with disabilities. In addition, WellPoint has been recognized among DiversityInc’s Top 10 Companies for People with Disabilities for the past two years and, over the years, Careers & the DisABLED Magazine has selected six of WellPoint’s employees as “Employees of the Year” for their individual accomplishments and achievements.

“We are proud to be recognized by NOD for our disability employment efforts,” said Tracy Edmonds, chief diversity officer. “We take great pride in the disability initiatives and best practices we have put in place to ensure we have an inclusive work environment and all of our associates have access to the tools, resources and information that allows them to be successful.”

More Press Releases